Arctic Ocean Margins

Margins are the start and end boundaries of a journey

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COASTLINE MARGINS

An Arctic Ocean Coastline margin is any point on shore or land.

Any Arctic Ocean journey utilising coastline margins is designated a Full Expedition or Full Crossing (Full refers to full-length).

Examples:

  • Ward Hunt Island to North Pole
  • Cape Arktichevski to North Pole to Ward Hunt Island

Note:

  • A Full Crossing of the Arctic Ocean must start and end on a coastline (see Mid-Ocean Margins for additional info)


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OFFSHORE MARGINS

An Arctic Ocean Offshore margin is any point within 50km of shore.

The Coastline Margin is reserved for any journey that intended to start or end on land but was forced to utilise offshore margins due to impassable ice conditions. Such a journey is designated an Expedition or Crossing.

Example: Cape Arktichevski to North Pole to 25km of Greenland

Note:

  • A Crossing of the Arctic Ocean must not start or end on a mid-ocean margin (see Mid-Ocean Margins for additional info)

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MID-OCEAN MARGINS

An Arctic Ocean Mid-Ocean margin is any point more than 50km from shore.


Any Arctic Ocean journey utilising mid-ocean margins is designated a Mid-Ocean Expedition or Mid-Ocean Crossing.

Examples:

  • North Pole to 65km from Svalbard
  • Cape Arktichevski to Northern Poles Line to 80km from Greenland

Notes:

  • A Mid-Ocean crossing will have at least one mid-ocean margin
  • If a journey gains a mid-ocean margin by seaborne transport it may be full if other margins and path criteria are met
  • Points on the Northern Poles Line are not classified as mid-ocean margins

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